TriggerFinger


GA election officials trying to block open records requests for election machines


Just The NewsA recently revealed memo shows a top-ranking Georgia election official informing county election workers that they are not required to provide journalists and citizens with records of software updates applied to voting machines in the state.

Chris Harvey, the state elections division director, said in the Nov. 17 memo that “multiple counties have reported receiving Open Records Requests asking for data information” including, in part, “copies of any software patches performed on Dominion voting machines in the state of Georgia prior to the November 3, 2020 General Election.”

“Under the Open Records Act,” Harvey writes in the memo, “providing copies of software, software updates, or thumb drives containing software or software updates is not subject to open records requests.”

There's some truth to the idea that providing copies of software used and exact versions & patches applied has security implications, but after the election those security implications seem very minimal. At worst, such requests (aside from copies of the software itself, which is probably protected by vendor's copyright, unless the agreements made it available) should be delayed until after the January 5th runoff. After that, there's no real reason that the software versions and patches on the election machines at the time the elections were run should not be made available.

So... what is there to hide here?

This entry was published Mon Dec 21 19:36:43 CST 2020 by TriggerFinger and last updated 2020-12-21 19:36:43.0. [Tweet]

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