TriggerFinger


Does signature verification work?


Review JournalClark County election officials accepted my signature on eight ballot return envelopes during the general election. It’s more evidence that signature verification is a flawed security measure.

I wanted to test that claim by simulating what might happen if someone returned ballots that didn’t belong to him or her...

On Monday, I asked Clark County Registrar Joe Gloria about this scenario. If ballots signed by someone else “came through, we would still have the signature match to rely on for identity,” he said. Asked if he was confident the safeguard would identify those ballots, he said, “I’m confident that the process has been working throughout this process.”

He was wrong. Eight of the nine ballots went through. In other words, signature verification had an 89 percent failure rate in catching mismatched signatures.

Large scale signature verification by relative amateurs has always been sketchy. For a small number of absentee votes where signatures can be scrutinized closely, it may be effective (at least at flagging obvious problems), and the number of votes at risk is small. Relying on it for a large scale situation like mass absentee voting it nuts.

This entry was published Wed Nov 18 11:42:55 CST 2020 by TriggerFinger and last updated 2020-11-13 23:05:09.0. [Tweet]

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